Canadian Judge Suspended for Wearing Donald Trump Hat

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A Canadian judge from Hamilton, Ontario who wore the recognizable red "Make America Great Again" hat has been suspended. The incident was meant to be a joke towards his fellow Clinton supporting judges, however the joke wasn't taken kindly by everyone as he is now not allowed to try any more cases.

The day after Donald Trump won the US presidential election Justice Bernd Zabel walked into his courtroom, in the morning, wearing the hat. He took it off when he sat down. He did it again after the morning break.

An Ontario Court of Justice spokeswoman said, "Justice Zabel stopped being assigned to preside in court December 21, 2016", indicating it was not something the court approved of doing.

It was reported that Zabel, shortly after the incident, said, "Brief appearance with the hat. Pissed off the rest of the judges because they all voted for Hillary so ... I was the only Trump supporter up there, but that's OK."

Many of Zabel's critics didn't take kindly to his remarks saying it undermines his apology that the hat was meant to be a joke.

"We are also filing a supplementary complaint to highlight that his in-court Nov. 9 statement is compelling evidence that he wore the Trump hat as a political statement and endorsement of Trump's values and ideology," a University of Waterloo law professor said in an email.

A similar situation involving a Hamilton city official showing off his Trump hat has drawn public criticism. David Serwatuk, a member of Hamilton city council's Committee of Adjustment had the hat sitting on the table during a meeting on November 17th.

Hamilton's Mayor Fred Eisenberger and others indicated the setting was inappropriate for "any kind of political posturing." Serwatuk later apologized for the incident.

Click here for more info on the incident.


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Those who nourish the hope that it will be possible to keep central government free of the corrupting tendencies of power and to staff it with a freedom-loving elite, overestimate the virtues of both the electorate and the elected, and underestimate the normative power of structural processes even over well-intended functionaries.

- Robert Nef